GPS Shoes for Tracking Down Alzheimer’s Patients

Standard

gvq9re8ifdj GPS Shoes for Tracking Down Alzheimers Patients  by STANLEY DARMA on Oct 26, 2011 • 12:09 pm

Shoes with built-in GPS could be useful for two purpose: either tracking down your lost shoes or tracking down the person who is wearing them. GTX Corp figured the latter option might be useful for safety purposes, especially for people who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. The company has been developing these shoes for two years now, which will feature a built-in GPS in the heels.

The purpose of the GPS is to ensure that family or other caregivers can see where the monitored person is at any given time. A primary feature of the service is an alarm system which will alert the family or caregivers when the person who is wearing the shoes is moving beyond a certain area. In the past there have been other GPS devices, like bracelets or watches, but these can easily get lost or the user forgets  to wear them. Shoes, however, are items that are difficult to forget when venturing outside the home.

GTX corp originally designed the shoes for children and long-distance runners, but professor Andrew Carle of George Mason University’s College of Health and Human Services advised to target the shoes at the elderly. The company expects that people will see the benefits of the shoes, such as less exposure to dangerous situations. And by preventing people getting lost, less money will be spent on finding people. The GPS shoes will sell for $300 a pair and are scheduled to go on sale this month in the US.

http://medgadget.com/2011/10/gps-shoes-for-tracking-down-alzheimers-patients.html

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s