Author Archives: kari kruger

About kari kruger

Multi-skilled, multi-talented and always up for adventure. I believe if we don't pay attention the important things in life they are easily missed. No man is an island and I love interacting with positive people.
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“Google and Samsung join forces to conquer the world…not really, but maybe”

“It reads like a sci-fi short: Google, giant of the computer world, who also just recently acquired an AI start-up, and Samsung, giant of just about everything else electronic, has joined forces. Well, to be fair, the two companies have announced that they will only be sharing their patents for the next 10 years. But we’re not taking off our tinfoil hats just yet.

The announcement obviously has major repercussions for consumers and other technology companies the world over, not only for the hitting power that the Google/Samsung front will now have against any other technology company in the big leagues, but also because of the period of the patent deal: 10 years in tech time is a very, very long time. Several reports have suggested that the two companies will be doing more than just swapping mobile patents to boot.

Just be glad you’re not the iCompetition.”

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I would love a GALAXY on my WRIST for my birthday this year…

“There are watches and then there are timepieces, and company Van Cleef & Arpel have no truck with the former if one of their latest designs is anything to go by. Their Midnight Planétarium, which was recently unveiled at the annual Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie in Geneva, isn’t anything as crass as a mere watch, the wrist-adornment features a representation of the five planets closest to the sun.

The planets, as impressive as they are since they’re made with semi-precious gems, wouldn’t be that remarkable on their own but Van Cleef & Arpel have made sure that they rotate in the same manner (and at the same time-scale) as their real-world counterparts.

Thus, a complete rotation of Earth will take a year to complete and Saturn will take a full 29 years to complete its circumnavigation of the wrist dial. The outer planets were excluded, at least partly because of the size of the mechanism needed to create it and because many won’t live long enough to see a full rotation of Uranus, let alone Neptune.

This sort of design and innovative thought doesn’t come cheap though, you’re looking at $245,000 (around R2.7 million) to place this piece of art on your arm.”

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Invisible Bike Helmet

“Though it’s nearing the end of summer, bicyclists will still be hitting the roads for the next couple of months. Hopefully most of them will be wearing helmets, though you will invariably see a few who are not because of the undesirable fashion statement and/or inconvenience of post-ride “helmet hair” (though having seen some of the injuries associated with not wearing helmets, this author believes that people who subscribe to the latter reason have not encountered true inconvenience.) These people may be in luck, however, thanks to the work of Hövding, a design/engineering/generally awesome company based in Sweden.

The invisible bike helmet is essentially a (visible) collar that bicyclists wear around their necks, the idea being that it will appeal to both users’ fashion sense and ergonomic need for insulation. Upon sensing an impact, the collar uses a small helium gas inflator to blow up a hood-shaped nylon airbag around the user’s head in about 100 milliseconds – cushioning the cranium before impact. The collar also contains a black box that records 10 seconds of movement data (from embedded accelerometers and gyros) during, and immediately before, a cycling accident. For more information, check out the video below.

[VIDEO]   http://www.medgadget.com/2012/08/invisible-bike-helmet-protects-head-and-fashion-sense-video.html

This appears to be an exciting development for bicyclists who don’t have many options when it comes to fashionable head protection. We previously covered a nascent solution for motorcyclists that embedded a fast cooling mechanism in the helmet and are glad to see that an increasing number of companies are working on cool, potentially life-saving technologies like these.”